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Lost in a sea of faces

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ladyyatexel:

vanishing-tardis:

This is an amazing book

is this real life

(via theblondevulcan)

vinebox:

On camera?

(Source: vinebox, via bewbin)

theroguefeminist:

elliedoh:

So when Miley Cyrus or Katy Perry bring black girls on stage, dance with them, acknowledge their figures- it’s offensive and appropriating. But, when Nicki Minaj makes an entire video focusing around black girl’s asses and asserts her power, reduces these women to objects and flaunts her authority it’s YAAASSSSS NICKI SERVE IT. Is that because she’s black? So it’s okay for people of the same race to dance with each other but someone who does not share the same levels of melanin enters the picture, they’re doing something wrong? …idgi 

You’re completely ignoring context. In Lily Allen’s Hard out Here video, she literally says, “I don’t shake my ass cause I have a brain” as Black women shake their asses in her video. She is literally degrading the Black women who shake their asses in the media. The song also uses references to Black rappers (i.e. the title of the song referencing the rap song “Hard out Here for a Pimp” and her lyric “bragging ‘bout my cars or talking ‘bout my chains”), suggesting that Black rappers are more sexist than white male musicians (which isn’t true, there’s lots of sexism in all music genres) and also suggest the source of sexism in the music industry is Black people (Black male rappers and twerking Black female dancers).

In contrast, Nicki Minaj is reclaiming a song (Baby Got Back) that was made by a Black male rapper who celebrated (but also objectified) Black female bodies. Throughout her song, Nicki raps like a man would, talking about her sexual conquests with men and the size of their dicks, almost as a way of doing to men what they have done to women (objectifying their dicks as Sir Mix A Lot objectified Black women’s asses and many other men objectify women’s vaginas). She also brags about her sexual prowess and stays in control and aggressive in the video (she goes as far as cutting a banana representing a dick and slapping Drake’s hand away—the video critiques the male gaze). The target of mockery and disparagement in Nicki’s video is men and the male gaze, and the video works to reclaim agency from it.

In what way is Nicki asserting power over her dancers? In her video, she twerks along side her back up dancers and dances with them and interacts with them on the same level. She is just as scantily clad as they are. Lily Allen, however, stays fully covered in her video, does not dance provocatively, and thus contrasts her own pure and respectable femininity with the Black women, using their twerking and scantily clad bodies as an example of “bad” female sexuality and femininity—of women “objectifying themselves.” This is racist because it frames Black female sexuality as lesser than white femininity and antithetical to feminism.

In summary: Nicki’s video is very much a celebration of female Black beauty and sexuality coming from a Black woman. Conversely, Lilly Allen’s is using Black women as props to frame them as a vile or bad form of sexuality or being too sexual to prop up her own feminism.

So you might say, “what about Miley Cyrus? she twerks along side her Black background dancers too!” But here’s the problem: Miley Cyrus continually appropriates Black culture and also uses Black women as props. It does matter that these artists are white because in these cases the point of including the Black women is either to, in Lily Allen’s case, offset Black sexuality/femininity as too sexual or bad in comparison with her white femininity/feminism, or, in the case of Miley Cyrus, to get “street cred” and exotify her own sexuality by appropriating Black culture and using Black people as props to do so. See this analysis of Lily Allen’s Hard Out Here video and this analysis of Miley Cyrus by Black people who know a lot more about this than I do.

I haven’t seen anything about Katy Perry using Black dancers. I’ve just seen criticisms of her appropriating AAVE and other PoC cultures. I’m not sure why you brought her up, but maybe I just haven’t seen the videos in question.

Either way, it’s not like white artists having a diverse cast of back up dancers is a bad thing automatically. Here is an example of a white artist using back up dancers of other races without objectifying them: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8Ilh1ewceco (notice this artist tackles the same issue as Lily Allen—sexism/objectification in the media—without being misogynist and racist toward other women). But the examples of Lily Allen and Miley Cyrus ARE racist and Nicki Minaj’s video isn’t the same as theirs.

(via whitegirlsaintshit)

sluttymistletoe:

cringing:

is no one going to talk about how miranda has been replaced with a random middle aged woman

if you knew anything about lizzie mcguire you would know that miranda is livin it up in Mexico City while Lizzie has an awesome adventure with Paolo and Isabella, while trying to avoid the evil wrath of Ms Ungermeyer, who is definitely not some “random middle aged woman”

thanks

(Source: zigazig-ah, via sami-i-ami)

vulcanthropy:

if you turn off all the lights, stand in front of a mirror, and say “leonard mccoy” three times, he won’t appear because he’s a doctor, damnit, not an urban legend

(via theblondevulcan)

une-chouette:

not-compatible:

you forgot this guy

Is this even real

(Source: best-of-memes, via shinyletsbegoodguys)

“ If a guy starts saying what you are doing is ‘reverse sexist’, he is obviously threatened by what you are doing. He’s threatened because he thinks there are only two ways to be: powerful or powerless. He assumes you asserting you rights is a way to take power away from him. He assumes you wanna ‘switch places’ with him. He knows you get treated like shit and he knows he gets advantages from your imposed inferiority. He’s fearing REVENGE, girlfriend. His fear of ‘reverse sexism’ is basically an admission on his part that he knows you get treated like shit and does not want to switch places with you. ”

—    

from Bikini Kill’s “Girl Power” zine (via earlyfrost)

If someone’s calling “misandry,” you’re probably doing it right.

(via radfemamazon)

(Source: sissypunks, via blue-tang-clan)

tittily:

my little cousin got bit by a house spider and she was crying so i went to get some stuff to soothe and numb it but before i could even walk out the door i heard her quietly whisper ‘i can’t handle the responsibility of being spiderman’

(via ce-les-ti-al)

fuckyeahdementia:

the moth pit

[video]

(Source: ForGIFs.com)

ulog89:

israelwc:

Palestinians launch #RubbleBucketChallenge to create awareness for suffering in #Gaza http://t.co/R8aOFpvbVc

WHOA

(via theeyesofapoet)

lydiduh:

alfronaut:

this was the most surreal experience of my life this girl with a Tiny Pony walked past me and didn’t acknowledge me at all and this like heavenly glow was following the Tiny Pony and a bee landed on my face??? i think i had a spiritual experience.

I think I’ve read enough Greek mythology to tell you that you may be pregnant now

(via theblondevulcan)

Laverne Cox stanning for Beyoncé at the VMAs

(Source: theontheruntour, via whitegirlsaintshit)

Franz Kafka, the story goes, encountered a little girl in the park where he went walking daily. She was crying. She had lost her doll and was desolate.

Kafka offered to help her look for the doll and arranged to meet her the next day at the same spot. Unable to find the doll he composed a letter from the doll and read it to her when they met.

"Please do not mourn me, I have gone on a trip to see the world. I will write you of my adventures." This was the beginning of many letters. When he and the little girl met he read her from these carefully composed letters the imagined adventures of the beloved doll. The little girl was comforted.

When the meetings came to an end Kafka presented her with a doll. She obviously looked different from the original doll. An attached letter explained: “my travels have changed me… “

Many years later, the now grown girl found a letter stuffed into an unnoticed crevice in the cherished replacement doll. In summary it said: “every thing that you love, you will eventually lose, but in the end, love will return in a different form.”

—    

May Benatar, Kafka and the Doll: The Pervasiveness of Loss

For me there are two wise lessons in this story: Grief and loss are ubiquitous even for a young child. And the way toward healing is to look for how love comes back in another form. - May Benatar

(via mercurieux)

(Source: easyreadingisdamnhardwriting, via afternoonsnoozebutton)